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Catherine McNeil for Beagle Freedom Project

BASTARDfanzine_Vol1_CatherineMcNeil“It’s a shame that humans have to use any animals to do these tests…” – Catherine McNeil

Supermodel, Catherine McNeil is Being Accomplished at Selfless Tasks And Righteous Deeds by donating the proceeds from the sale of her fanzine to the Beagle Freedom Project, which rescues beagles and other animals from labs after the labs have done testing on them. They then foster them to homes and put them in better places. “It’s a shame that humans have to use any animals to do these tests but at the moment there is no real alternative. I think it’s going to be quite hard and take a long time for them to stop testing on animals. It’s great to have the support of the fashion community, especially with BASTARD fanzine launching this project, to help me raise money by donating the proceeds to the Beagle Freedom Project.”

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beaglefreedomprojectBeagle Freedom Project began in December 2010 when Shannon Keith received information that beagles who were used for animal experiments in a research lab were to be given a chance at freedom. Our mission is rescuing and finding homes for beagles used in laboratory research.

20150928_162443a.jpgBeagles are the most popular breed for lab use because of their friendly, docile, trusting, forgiving, people-pleasing personalities. The research industry says they adapt well to living in a cage, and are inexpensive to feed. Research beagles are usually obtained directly from commercial breeders who specifically breed dogs to sell to scientific institutions.

Testing done on beagles in university and other research facilities includes medical/pharmaceutical, household products and cosmetics. When they are no longer wanted for research purposes, some labs attempt to find homes for adoptable, healthy beagles. Working directly with these labs, Beagle Freedom Project is able to remove and transport beagles to place them in loving homes. All rescues are done legally with the cooperation of the facility.

Anyone interested in fostering or adopting a lab beagle should be aware of the challenges these dogs have. They will not be accustomed to life in a home and will not have experience with children, cats, or other dogs. They will not be house-trained and accidents will happen, although they learn quickly. Many have gone directly from a commercial breeder to the lab, and have never felt grass under their feet or even seen the sun. They will have been fed a special diet formulated for lab animals and may be difficult to adjust to new foods. They will be unfamiliar with treats, toys, bedding and may never have walked on a leash. They will have lived in cages with steel wire floors and may have inflamed or infected paws from the pressure. They may be fearful of people initially and may have phobias from a lifetime in confinement or from being restrained. They are likely to have been surgically de-barked by the breeder and have an ID number tattooed in their ear. Please also be aware that although these beagles are considered healthy, you will be given very little information about the beagle’s medical history, and you will not be told its origins or what kind of testing they may have been used for.

Beagle Freedom Project

With time, patience, play, companionship, love – and most of all, freedom – these dogs will learn how to become dogs, and their transformation will be amazing.

Our hope is that with your help, we can encourage more research labs to release animals and give them a chance at life, instead of destroying adoptable pets.

Beagle Freedom Project is a service of Animal Rescue, Media & Education (ARME). Founded in 2004, ARME is a nonprofit advocacy group created to eliminate the suffering of all animals through rescue, public education and outreach. ARME has found homes for thousands of homeless and abandoned animals. In 2004 ARME organized the first-ever “Shelter Drive” to provide creature comforts to homeless animals such as beds, toys and treats. ARME’s Shelter Drive became an annual tradition uniting volunteers with businesses that allowed drop boxes for donations. ARME’s compassionate army also helps feed and shelter displaced animals when Southern California fires strike residential areas. As a 501(c)(3) organization contributions to ARME are tax-deductible.

(sourced:  beaglefreedomproject.org)

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